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View Full Version : Alcohol ad banning would be "last option"



Rudolph Muller
03-09-2012, 08:04 AM
Banning alcohol adverts would be government's last option when dealing with the country's high alcohol usage, Deputy Trade and Industry (dti) Minister Elizabeth Thabethe says.

"The last, last option is to ban alcohol advertising. It is not right to promote liquor as we are doing in South Africa, we cannot glorify advertisements that say that people must emulate what they see," Thabethe said on Thursday, calling for responsible trading.

The Deputy Minister was speaking at the Liquor Regulation Conference in Johannesburg which forms part of the department's mandate to regulate the liquor industry.

The conference follows on a summit held in Durban last year where several resolutions were taken and issues such as reduced hours of alcohol sales, the harmonisation of laws and policies to help effective regulation as well as the raising of the liquor consumption age from 18 to 21 years were discussed, among others.

The dti is aiming to develop a comprehensive Liquor Policy by 2012/2013.

"The dti realised that it needed to cluster together matters that may be addressed jointly and invite all stakeholders to air their views so as to have a framework on which to start drafting the policy," said Thabethe.

The Deputy Minister expressed concern about adverts encouraging children to drink and the issue of taverns operating close to schools was also highlighted. This was seen as giving children access to alcohol.

The deputy minister said that though government supported business, trading should be done within the bounds of the law. "We have reached crisis point with our youth. We need responsible trading."

As to raising the legal drinking age to 21, the deputy minister said this would be discussed and that the due processes should be given time to take effect. Thabethe said raising the age at which one could legally drink alcohol would make an impact in curbing alcohol abuse.

"Liquor is not meant for children," she said.

Chief Phatekile Holomisa, President of the Congress of Traditional Leaders of South Africa (Contralesa) said traditional leaders were supportive of legislation that restricts the use of liquor to people under 21 years of age.

Deputy Director General at the dti, Zodwa Ntuli, said the issues raised by various parties would require the law to be amended. She said following consultation with the industry, a draft document would be taken to Cabinet.

"We are now at a discussion point," explained Ntuli.

On the issue of liquor trading hours, government meets with the provinces regularly to discuss trading hour standards.

Additionally, the sale of liquor on Sundays which could result in people not turning up for work on Mondays is also under discussion. According to Thabethe, there is no discussion as yet to ban the selling of alcohol on Sundays. - BuaNews

peterson
03-09-2012, 10:50 AM
Banning alcohol advertising should not be an option. What will be next? Banning KFC ads because of obesity? Banning car ads because of the high death toll on roads?

latro
03-12-2012, 01:34 AM
Well, they banned the cigarette ads. Why not alchohol ads too?

And changing the requirement to 21 would be taking a step backwards imo because coming of age implies your an adult and capable of making informed decisions by yourself.

Dragon_Void
03-12-2012, 07:12 AM
Banning it wont make a difference, nothing will stop alcohol abuse, not even new laws

R13...
03-12-2012, 12:33 PM
I'm sure some other hysterical minister will call for an immediate at a road accident over easter. They like doing that these ministers of ours.

robt
03-14-2012, 02:46 PM
I say we also ban scenes in movies of people drinking alcohol and then you've definitely gotta ban pubs and liquor stores. And while you're at it why don't we just go ahead and ban the reporting of alcoholic related activities like sports matches and rock concerts.

Hell why not just ban the media, oh wait ... I think they are actually trying to do that :).

LearnDaily
03-18-2012, 01:38 PM
Unfortunately, I do not think that banning alcohol would work. It is actually up to parents to keep an eye on their children and bars to make sure that they check for fake IDs. The only thing that would happen is that the production of bootleg liquor would increase and government would not be able to do any quality control. That just gets dangerous.

Pooky
03-19-2012, 07:01 PM
Nope, most probably the people who abuse it the most don't even see the adverts.

McT
03-19-2012, 08:05 PM
Banning alcohol advertising should not be an option. What will be next? Banning KFC ads because of obesity? Banning car ads because of the high death toll on roads?

That said, the health minister is working on banning ads of certain foods which target young children. This will no doubt be next.


Well, they banned the cigarette ads. Why not alchohol ads too?

And changing the requirement to 21 would be taking a step backwards imo because coming of age implies your an adult and capable of making informed decisions by yourself.

I am not sure how successful banning tobacco advertising has been, but I am sure that absence of the visuals in your face all the time has contributed to a certain extent. I think it is more a case of changing perception of things and focusing people on healthy alternatives which will win the day.

Alcohol on the other hand is probably going to be an even tougher battle.