Vodacom forks over R1.25 million settlement in privacy violation case

The Daily Maverick has reported that Vodacom paid R1.25 million to settle a legal battle with Paul O’Sullivan after giving his cellular records to underworld boss Radovan Krejcir’s legal team.

This followed a legal battle where O’Sullivan said Vodacom owes him R2 million for handing over his personal information without his permission.

He said that he spent R2 million on legal fees after Vodacom gave his personal information to a firm of attorneys representing Krejcir in 2014.

O’Sullivan was investigating Krejcir at the time, and O’Sullivan was forced to launch an interdict to have his records handed back.

The Daily Maverick stated that the court ordered Krejcir to pay costs in the matter, but he has since been declared insolvent.

“Vodacom are not above the law,” said O’Sullivan on the matter.

“If they think they can hand my cellular records over to the mafia and get away with it, they have a big shock coming to them.”

Matter settled

O’Sullivan told The Citizen that the issue had “become settled, but my attorney tells me I am not permitted to discuss the matter further”.

Vodacom spokesperson Byron Kennedy said in May 2017 that the company has released “certain information under a lawfully-issued subpoena, as it was obliged to do so in terms of Section 179 of the Criminal Procedure Act”.

Kennedy added at the time that “Vodacom will be defending the matter”.

Vodacom has now confirmed “the parties reached an out-of-court settlement on a matter that both parties are contractually precluded from commenting on”.

“What we can put on record without compromising this agreement is that Vodacom denies both that it illegally handed over Mr O’ Sullivan’s details and that it breaches its customers right to privacy,” a Vodacom spokesperson told MyBroadband.


Read: Vodacom picks up 1.5 million new customers in South Africa

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Vodacom forks over R1.25 million settlement in privacy violation case