Massive upgrades are coming to South Africa’s busiest highways – and they could take up to 8 years to complete

The South African National Roads Agency (Sanral) will put out the first tender contracts for the upgrading of the N2 and N3 highways  ‘in the next few weeks’.

In a statement on Wednesday (18 September), the agency said that the first contracts will see an upgrading of the N2 from the Kwamashu Interchange to the Umdloti Interchange, and the upgrading of the N3 from Cato Ridge to the Lynnfield Interchange.

“The work, which is being tendered out in reasonably sized packages for sections of the freeway, will entail the construction of an additional two lanes in each direction as well as rehabilitation/reconstruction of existing pavement layers and widening of several structures,” it said.

“A stipulation of the contracts is that successful tenderers must be B-BBEE Level 1 to 4 and subcontract a minimum of 30% of the value of the contract to Exempt Micro Enterprises (EMEs) or Qualifying Small Enterprises (QSEs) that are more than 51% black-owned.

“A minimum of 8% of each of the contracts will also be required to be spent on various types of labour opportunities from targeted areas.”

Sanral said that the full extent of the planned upgrades on N2 and N3 are expected to take up to eight years to complete.

It added that the improved roads will strengthen the logistics and transport corridor between South Africa’s main industrial hubs, improve access to Durban’s export and import facilities, and raise efficiency along the corridor including access to the Dube TradePort Special Economic Zone.

“The upgrade of the N2 will focus on a 55km length, from Lovu River on the South Coast, to Umdloti on the North Coast,” it said.

“The N3 upgrade will focus on an 80km section from Durban to Pietermaritzburg.”


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Massive upgrades are coming to South Africa’s busiest highways – and they could take up to 8 years to complete