SKA largely based in South Africa

The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) Organisation will consider constructing two of the three SKA receiver components in South Africa, Minister of Science and Technology Naledi Pandor said in a statement to the press today (25 May 2012).

This follows an announcement by the SKA Organisation to share the location of the world’s most powerful telescope between South Africa and Australia.

“A meeting of the members has decided to split the project which is an unexpected decision given the search for a single site,” Pandor said, explaining that was in order to be inclusive.

Pandor said that they had hoped the unambiguous recommendation of the SKA Site Advisory Committee would be accepted as the most sound scientific outcome.

The SKA organisation said that the majority of SKA dishes in Phase 1 will be built in South Africa, combined with MeerKAT. Further SKA dishes will be added to the ASKAP array in Australia.

All the dishes and the mid frequency aperture arrays for Phase II of the SKA will be built in Southern Africa while the low frequency aperture array antennas for Phase I and II will be built in Australia / New Zealand, the SKA Organisation said.

“This hugely important step for the project allows us to progress the design and prepare for the construction phase of the telescope. The SKA will transform our view of the Universe; with it we will see back to the moments after the Big Bang and discover previously unexplored parts of the cosmos,” said Dr Michiel van Haarlem, interim director general of the SKA Organisation.

“We accept the compromise in the interest of science and as acknowledgement of the sterling work done by our scientists and the excellent SKA project team,” said Pandor.

The full statement by the Minister follows below:

MeerKAT
MeerKAT

The long and eagerly awaited announcement regarding the site for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) radio telescope was made following today’s meeting of the members of the SKA Organisation at Schiphol Airport in the Netherlands.

After nine-years of work by the South African and Australian SKA site bid teams, the independent SKA Site Advisory Committee (SSAC), composed of world-renowned experts, carried out an objective technical and scientific assessment of the sites in South Africa and Australia, and identified by consensus Africa as the preferred site.

However, in order to be inclusive, the SKA Organisation has agreed to consider constructing one of the three SKA receiver components in Australia. Two will be constructed in Africa. A meeting of the members has decided to split the project which is an unexpected decision given the search for a single site. We had hoped the unambiguous recommendation of the SSAC would be accepted as the most sound scientific outcome. We accept the compromise in the interest of science and as acknowledgement of the sterling work done by our scientists and the excellent SKA project team.

An important aspect of the site decision is the recognition of the MeerKAT telescope, being designed and built in the Northern Cape Karoo by South African scientists and engineers, as a critical step towards the implementation of the SKA. The MeerKAT will supplement the sensitive SKA Phase 1 dish array, providing a quarter of the collection area of what will be the most sensitive radio telescope in the world. This recognition is substantive evidence of the great strides made by the local radio astronomy community since South Africa signalled its interest in the SKA.

South Africa, with its eight partner countries – Botswana, Ghana, Kenya, Madagascar, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia and Zambia – have been working on the bid to host the SKA since 2003. The final proposal was submitted to the SKA Siting Group on 15 September 2011.

On the basis of its analysis of technical, scientific and other factors, the SSAC unambiguously and by consensus found in favour of the African proposal, as well as the African implementation plans and cost factors. Consequently, the SSAC recommended South Africa and its partner countries as the preferred site for the SKA.

The decision by the SKA Organisation to build the majority of the SKA in Africa coincides with our celebrations for Africa Day today. It also fits in well with the African agenda as we celebrate the 49th anniversary of the founding of the Organisation of African Unity and the 10th anniversary of the African Union. The SKA has been endorsed by the African Union, both in 2010 and earlier this year.

The SKA project is a global scientific enterprise to build one of the largest scientific instruments ever envisaged. It is being designed to answer fundamental questions in physics, astronomy and cosmology in order for us to understand the origin and workings of the Universe better, and to reveal new and unexpected phenomena that will enthral and challenge us. Since 2005, we have awarded nearly 400 grants and bursaries to postdoctoral fellows and PhD and MSc students and undergraduate students.

We remain committed to the SKA project.

I would like to thank my Cabinet colleagues, especially the Interministerial Committee on the SKA, the Deputy Minister of Science and Technology, scientists and astronomers, the Presidency, officials at the Department of Science and Technology, in particular the Director-General, Dr Phil Mjwara, and Dr Bernie Fanaroff and the entire team at the Square Kilometre Array Project Office for their unwavering support.

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SKA largely based in South Africa